Welcome to the UPF Digital Repository

Helping teachers to think about their design problem: a pilot study to stimulate design thinking

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hernández Leo, Davinia
dc.contributor.author Agostinho, Shirley
dc.contributor.author Beardsley, Marc
dc.contributor.author Bennet, Sue
dc.contributor.author Lockyer, Lori
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-09T16:34:11Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-09T16:34:11Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Hernández-Leo D, Agostinho S, Beardsley M, Bennett S, Lockyer L. Helping teachers to think about their design problem: a pilot study to stimulate design thinking. In: Gómez Chova L, López Martínez A, Candel Torres I, editors. EDULEARN17 Proceedings 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies; 2017 Jul 3-5; Barcelona, Spain. Valencia: IATED; 2017. p. 5681-90. DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2017.2291
dc.identifier.isbn 978-84-697-3777-4
dc.identifier.issn 2340-1117
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/32247
dc.description Comunicació presentada a: 9th annual International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies EDULEARN17, celebrat del 3 al 5 de juliol de 2017 a Barcelona.
dc.description.abstract Designing learning experiences for students is a key responsibility of teachers. This involves designing stimulating and engaging tasks, selecting and creating appropriate resources, and deciding how best to support students to successfully complete the tasks. This is a complex process in which many factors need to be considered. Learning design research and tooling is focused on how to support this teacher design work. Existing learning design tools support the authoring and sharing of learning activities, which - if represented computationally - can also be enacted in virtual learning environments. An important part of the learning design process is thinking about what it is that students are to learn. This then informs the design of the learning activities. However, research on how to support this early phase of the learning design process is scarce. Indeed, an emerging finding from research investigating teacher design practices is that teachers’ design work exhibits some characteristics synonymous with the broader field of design. Specifically, teachers formulate and work with a design problem. But, teachers generally don’t consider their work in terms of design. Thus there is scope to encourage and support design thinking in teachers along the whole learning design process, including in the initial phase of identifying a design problem. This paper reports on a pilot study where a learning design Problem Generation Tool was created, in the form of 20 stimulus questions, to generate deeper thinking about the design problem. The stimulus questions are based on 3 foci, which are to be considered in an iterative way to think about and generate the problem: Understand the nature of the design problem and your goals (e.g, What kind of problem is this? Why is this design being done?) Map your context (e.g., Who are the students? How will the course be taught? Who will teach in this course?), Plan your design approach (e.g., What preparation do you have to do? What is your initial plan or steps you will follow for your design process?) The tool was incorporated in the Integrated Learning Design Environment (ILDE), a community platform that integrates a number of learning design tools supporting conceptualization, authoring and implementation of learning activities. The Problem Generation Tool integrated in ILDE was used with eight participants, who were already familiar with ILDE, in a workshop setting in a postgraduate program at a local University in Barcelona, Spain. Participants had between one and five or more years of teaching experience. Results showed that participants found the Problem Generation Tool helpful. The level of perceived usefulness by question varied across participants, while a few questions were not sufficiently clear and need to be revised. Overall, there was evident elaboration of the participants’ design problems thus suggesting design thinking was stimulated and identification of the design problems scaffolded.
dc.description.sponsorship This work has been partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness under RESET (TIN2014-53199-C3-3-R), the Maria de Maeztu Units of Excellence Programme (MDM-2015- 0502) and RecerCaixa (CoT project). Hernández-Leo is a Serra Hunter fellow. The Problem Generation Tool was devised from research funded by the Australian Research Council through the Discovery Project scheme (DP140100406): “Designing effective learning experiences: Investigating novice and expert teachers’ design processes” (Lockyer, Bennett, & Agostinho).
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher IATED
dc.relation.ispartof Gómez Chova L, López Martínez A, Candel Torres I, editors. EDULEARN17 Proceedings 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies; 2017 Jul 3-5; Barcelona, Spain. Valencia: IATED; 2017. p. 5681-90.
dc.rights © IATED
dc.title Helping teachers to think about their design problem: a pilot study to stimulate design thinking
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObject
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2017.2291
dc.subject.keyword Learning design
dc.subject.keyword Teacher design thinking
dc.subject.keyword Technology
dc.subject.keyword Pilot
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/1PE/TIN2014-53199-C3-3-R
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics

Compliant to Partaking