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Short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution reveals a compound-specific circulating miRNA profile indicating multiple disease risks

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dc.contributor.author Krauskopf, Julian
dc.contributor.author van Veldhoven, Karin
dc.contributor.author Chadeau-Hyam, Marc
dc.contributor.author Vermeulen, Roel
dc.contributor.author Carrasco Turigas, Glòria
dc.contributor.author Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.
dc.contributor.author Vineis, Paolo
dc.contributor.author Kok, Theo M. de
dc.contributor.author Kleinjans, Jos C.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-23T08:35:12Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-23T08:35:12Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Krauskopf J, van Veldhoven K, Chadeau-Hyam M, Vermeulen R, Carrasco-Turigas G, Nieuwenhuijsen M et al. Short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution reveals a compound-specific circulating miRNA profile indicating multiple disease risks. Environ Int. 2019;128:193-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.04.063
dc.identifier.issn 0160-4120
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/43392
dc.description.abstract Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is a complex mixture of compounds that contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases including several types of cancer, pulmonary, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and more recently also diabetes mellitus. In search of an early diagnostic biomarker for improved environmental health risk assessment, recent human studies have shown that certain extracellular miRNAs are altered upon exposure to TRAP. Here, we present a global circulating miRNA analysis in a human population exposed to different levels of TRAP. The cross-over study, with sampling taking place during resting and physical activity in two different exposure scenarios, included for each subject personal exposure measurements of PM10,PM2.5, NO, NO2, CO, CO2, BC and UFP. Next-generation sequencing technology was used to identify global circulating miRNA levels across all subjects. We identified 8 miRNAs to be associated with the mixture of TRAP and 27 miRNAs that were associated with the individual pollutants NO, NO2, CO, CO2, BC and UFP. We did not find significant associations between miRNA levels and PM10 or PM2.5. Integrated network analysis revealed that these circulating miRNAs are potentially involved in processes that are implicated in the development of air pollution-induced diseases. Altogether, this study demonstrates that signatures consisting of circulating miRNAs present a potential novel biomarker to be used in health risk assessment.
dc.description.sponsorship This work has been supported by the European Union within the frame of the Exposomics (226756) project.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.relation.ispartof Environment International. 2019;128:193-200
dc.rights © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/
dc.title Short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution reveals a compound-specific circulating miRNA profile indicating multiple disease risks
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.04.063
dc.subject.keyword Air pollution
dc.subject.keyword Biomarker
dc.subject.keyword Diesel-exhaust
dc.subject.keyword Environmental health
dc.subject.keyword microRNAs
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/226756
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

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