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dc.contributor.author Pujol Martí, Jesús, 1981-
dc.contributor.author Blanco Hinojo, Laura, 1981-
dc.contributor.author Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard
dc.contributor.author Deus, Joan
dc.contributor.author Pérez Solá, Victor
dc.contributor.author Sunyer Deu, Jordi
dc.date.accessioned 2021-09-06T06:59:02Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.citation Pujol J, Blanco-Hinojo L, Martínez-Vilavella G, Deus J, Pérez-Sola V, Sunyer J. Dysfunctional brain reward system in child obesity. Cereb Cortex. 2021;31(9):4376-85. DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhab092
dc.identifier.issn 1047-3211
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/48394
dc.description.abstract Eating habits leading to obesity may reflect nonhomeostatic behavior based on excessive immediate-reward seeking. However, it is currently unknown to what extent excess weight is associated with functional alterations in the brain's reward system in children. We tested the integrity of reward circuits using resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in a population of 230 children aged 8-12 years. The major components of the reward system were identified within the ventral striatum network defined on the basis of the nucleus accumbens connectivity pattern. The functional structure of the cerebral cortex was characterized using a combination of local functional connectivity measures. Higher body mass index was associated with weaker connectivity between the cortical and subcortical elements of the reward system, and enhanced the integration of the sensorimotor cortex to superior parietal areas relevant to body image formation. Obese children, unlike WHO-defined overweight condition, showed functional structure alterations in the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala region similar to those previously observed in primary obsessive-compulsive disorder and Prader-Willi syndrome associated with obsessive eating behavior. Results further support the view that childhood obesity is not simply a deviant habit with restricted physical health consequences but is associated with reward system dysfunction characterizing behavioral control disorders.
dc.description.sponsorship European Research Council under the ERC [grant number 268479]—the BREATHE project.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Oxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartof Cereb Cortex. 2021;31(9):4376-85
dc.rights © Oxford University Press. This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Cerebral cortex following peer review. The version of record Pujol J, Blanco-Hinojo L, Martínez-Vilavella G, Deus J, Pérez-Sola V, Sunyer J. Dysfunctional brain reward system in child obesity. Cereb Cortex. 2021;31(9):4376-85. DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhab092 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhab092
dc.title Dysfunctional brain reward system in child obesity
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhab092
dc.subject.keyword Eating behavior
dc.subject.keyword Excess weight
dc.subject.keyword Obsessive–compulsive behavior
dc.subject.keyword Orbitofrontal cortex
dc.subject.keyword Ventral striatum
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/268479
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion

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