Welcome to the UPF Digital Repository

The determinants of low-intensity intergroup violence: the case of Northern Ireland

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Balcells, Laia
dc.contributor.author Daniels, Lesley-Ann
dc.contributor.author Escribà-Folch, Abel
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-09T07:50:53Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-09T07:50:53Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Balcells L, Daniels LA, Escribà-Folch A. The determinants of low-intensity intergroup violence: the case of Northern Ireland. J Peace Res. 2016;53(1):33-48. DOI: 10.1177/0022343315610399
dc.identifier.issn 0022-3433
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/42411
dc.description Includes supplementary materials: online appendix; replication file
dc.description.abstract What accounts for low-intensity intergroup violence? This article explores the determinants of low-intensity sectarian violence in Northern Ireland, which has marked the post-1998 peace agreement period. Low-intensity violence comprises a variety of events from riots to attacks against other civilians as well as against homes and symbolic buildings such as churches. We argue that this violence is more likely and prevalent in interface areas where similarly sized rival communities are geographically in contact with each other. Parity and contact spur intergroup competition and threat perception, and they increase the viability of violence. We use original cross-sectional time-series violence data for the 2005–12 period at a disaggregated subnational level, the ward, and a wide variety of social and economic indicators to test our hypotheses. In particular, we assess the impact of within-ward ethnic composition, on the one hand, and the ethnic composition of neighboring wards, on the other. We find that the number of intergroup violent events peaks in wards where there is parity between groups, and in predominantly Catholic (Protestant) wards that border predominantly Protestant (Catholic) wards. The article makes two main contributions: it shows that micro-level dynamics of violence can expand beyond local territorial units, and it suggests that ethnic segregation is unlikely to prevent intergroup violence.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher SAGE Publications
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Peace Research. 2016. 53(1):33-48
dc.rights Balcells L, Daniels LA, Escribà-Folch A. The determinants of low-intensity intergroup violence: the case of Northern Ireland. Journal of Peace Research. 2016. 53(1):33-48. Copyright © 2016 SAGE Publications. DOI: 10.1177/0022343315610399
dc.title The determinants of low-intensity intergroup violence: the case of Northern Ireland
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022343315610399
dc.subject.keyword Northern Ireland
dc.subject.keyword Parity
dc.subject.keyword Sectarian violence
dc.subject.keyword Segregation
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics

In collaboration with Compliant to Partaking