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Creatively escaping insularity and encouraging internationalism: British radicalism, history from below, and public relations historiography

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dc.contributor.author Xifra, Jordi
dc.contributor.author McKie, David
dc.contributor.author Collell, Maria Rosa
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-07T08:39:46Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Xifra J, McKie D, Collell MR. Creatively escaping insularity and encouraging internationalism: British radicalism, history from below, and public relations historiography. Public Relat Rev. 2018 Jun 30;45(2):275-81. DOI: 10.1016/j.pubrev.2018.06.007
dc.identifier.issn 0363-8111
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/44170
dc.description.abstract In this article, we examine what PR history can learn from a small but internationally influential group of radical historians in Britain. In particular, we examine how they managed to be powerfully democratic through an imaginative sensitivity to the voices of people often excluded from history; through grounding research in specific, often small, localities, and communities; and paradoxically, managing to avoid enough of the insularity associated with the notorious “little Britain” mindset to attract interest and interactions from historians across the world. Our article highlights the relevance to PR history of the following four aspects: 1) their awareness of the need to interact locally and beyond national boundaries; 2) their concern for inclusion (especially for subjects excluded or marginalized in earlier historical accounts); 3) their strategies for escaping insularity and increasing interdisciplinarity; and 4) their illustrations of imagination as a vital component in historical writing. For contemporary PR history writing we argue: that the first aspect, the fusion of the local with the post-national, has become a necessity as globalization keeps expanding; that the second, strategic inclusiveness, has urgency for a field reflecting on the social shortcomings of its own organization-centered past; that the third, interdisciplinary, has intensified in utility as fields adapt to the massive growth in different kinds of knowledge (from big data to neuroscience); and that the fourth, passionate and engaged imagination, is needed for revisionist accounts of the past to help reclaim more prosocial futures.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.relation.ispartof Public relations review. 2018 Jun 30;45(2):275-81
dc.rights © Elsevier http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2018.06.007
dc.title Creatively escaping insularity and encouraging internationalism: British radicalism, history from below, and public relations historiography
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2018.06.007
dc.subject.keyword Public relations historiography
dc.subject.keyword History from below
dc.subject.keyword Communist party historians group
dc.subject.keyword E. P. Thompson
dc.subject.keyword George Rudé
dc.subject.keyword Eric Hobsbawm
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion

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