Browsing by Author "Hinzen, Wolfram"

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  • Hinzen, Wolfram; Rosselló i Ximenes, Joana; McKenna, Peter J. (Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2016)
    Delusions are widely believed to reflect disturbed cognitive function, but the nature of this remains elusive. The "un-Cartesian" cognitive-linguistic hypothesis maintains (a) that there is no thought separate from language, ...
  • Hinzen, Wolfram; Sevilla, Gabriel; Rosselló i Ximenes, Joana; Salvador, Raymond; Sarró, Salvador; López-Araquistain, Laura; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018)
    Formal thought disorder (TD) is a neuropathology manifest in formal language dysfunction, but few behavioural linguistic studies exist. These have highlighted problems in the domain of semantics and more specifically of ...
  • Zimmerer, Vitor C.; Watson, Stuart; Turkington, Douglas; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Hinzen, Wolfram (Frontiers, 2017)
    Emerging linguistic evidence points at disordered language behavior as a defining characteristic of schizophrenia. In this article, we review this literature and demonstrate how a framework focusing on two core functions ...
  • Hinzen, Wolfram; Schroeder, Kristen (Imprint Academic, 2015)
    The notion of 'the first person' is centrally invoked in philosophical discussions of selfhood, subjectivity, and personhood. We ask whether this notion, as invoked in these discussions, is con-tingently or essentially a ...
  • Hinzen, Wolfram (Wiley, 2017)
    The view that proper names are uniformly predicates (‘predicativism’) has recently gained prominence. I review linguistic evidence against it. Overall, the (cross-) linguistic evidence suggests that proper names function ...
  • Hinzen, Wolfram (De Gruyter, 2016)
    All forms of nominal reference, whether quantificational, definite, rigid, deictic, or personal, require that the nominals in question appear in relevant grammatical configurations. Reference is in this sense a grammatical ...
  • Hinzen, Wolfram; Çokal, Derya; Sevilla, Gabriel; Jones, William Stephen; Zimmerer, Vitor C.; Deamer, Felicity; Douglas, Maggie; Spencer, Helen; Turkington, Douglas; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Varley, Rosemary; Watson, Stuart (Nature Publishing Group, 2018)
    Formal thought disorder (FTD) is clinically manifested as disorganized speech, but there have been only few investigations of its linguistic properties. We examined how disturbance of thought may relate to the referential ...