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Air pollution exposure during fetal life, brain morphology, and cognitive function in school-age children

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dc.contributor.author Guxens Junyent, Mònica
dc.contributor.author Lubczyńska, Małgorzata Joanna, 1984-
dc.contributor.author Muetzel, Ryan L.
dc.contributor.author Dalmau Bueno, Albert
dc.contributor.author Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.
dc.contributor.author Hoek, Gerard
dc.contributor.author van der Lugt, Aad
dc.contributor.author Verhulst, Frank C.
dc.contributor.author White, Tonya
dc.contributor.author Brunekreef, Bert
dc.contributor.author Tiemeier, Henning
dc.contributor.author El Marroun, Hanan
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-22T08:01:19Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Guxens M, Lubczyńska MJ, Muetzel RL, Dalmau-Bueno A, Jaddoe VWV, Hoek G et al. Air pollution exposure during fetal life, brain morphology, and cognitive function in school-age children. Biol Psychiatry. 2018; 84(4):295-303. DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.01.016
dc.identifier.issn 0006-3223
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/42132
dc.description.abstract Background: Air pollution exposure during fetal life has been related to impaired child neurodevelopment, but it is unclear if brain structural alterations underlie this association. The authors assessed whether air pollution exposure during fetal life alters brain morphology and whether these alterations mediate the association between air pollution exposure during fetal life and cognitive function in school-age children. Methods: We used data from a population-based birth cohort set up in Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2002–2006). Residential levels of air pollution during the entire fetal period were calculated using land-use regression models. Structural neuroimaging and cognitive function were performed at 6 to 10 years of age (n = 783). Models were adjusted for several socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics. Results: Mean fine particle levels were 20.2 μg/m3 (range, 16.8–28.1 μg/m3). Children exposed to higher particulate matter levels during fetal life had thinner cortex in several brain regions of both hemispheres (e.g., cerebral cortex of the precuneus region in the right hemisphere was 0.045 mm thinner (95% confidence interval, 0.028–0.062) for each 5-μg/m3 increase in fine particles). The reduced cerebral cortex in precuneus and rostral middle frontal regions partially mediated the association between exposure to fine particles and impaired inhibitory control. Air pollution exposure was not associated with global brain volumes. Conclusions: Exposure to fine particles during fetal life was related to child brain structural alterations of the cerebral cortex, and these alterations partially mediated the association between exposure to fine particles during fetal life and impaired child inhibitory control. Such cognitive impairment at early ages could have significant long-term consequences.
dc.description.sponsorship This work was supported by European Community Seventh Framework Program Grant Nos. GA#211250 (to BB) and GA#243406 (BB; principal investigator, Ranjeet S. Sokhi) for air pollution exposure assessment; The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (Geestkracht Program Grant No. 10.000.1003 (to HT) and Grant No. TOP 40-00812-98-11021 [to TW]); the Health Effects Institute, an organization jointly funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Assistance Award Grant No. R-82811201), and certain motor vehicle and engine manufacturers (to MG); The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development Grant Nos. VIDI 016.136.361 (to VWVJ) and The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research Grant No. 016.VICI.170.200 (to HT); European Research Council Grant No. ERC-2014-CoG-64916 (to VWVJ); European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program Grant Nos. 633595 (DynaHEALTH) (to HT) and 733206 (LifeCycle) (to VWVJ); a personal fellowship (EUR Fellow 2014) from the Erasmus University Rotterdam (to HEM); and Miguel Servet fellowship Grant Nos. MS13/00054 and CP13/00054 (to MG) awarded by the Spanish Institute of Health Carlos III (Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Society of Biological Psychiatry
dc.relation.ispartof Biological Psychiatry. 2018; 84(4):295-303
dc.rights © 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry
dc.title Air pollution exposure during fetal life, brain morphology, and cognitive function in school-age children
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.01.016
dc.subject.keyword Child development
dc.subject.keyword Cognition
dc.subject.keyword Cohort studies
dc.subject.keyword Environmental pollution
dc.subject.keyword Neuroimaging
dc.subject.keyword Particulate matter
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/633595
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/733206
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion

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