Welcome to the UPF Digital Repository

A comparative analysis of role attainment and impairment in binge-eating disorder and bulimia nervosa: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Kessler, Ronald C.
dc.contributor.author Alonso Caballero, Jordi
dc.contributor.author Xavier, Miguel
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-07T07:55:40Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-07T07:55:40Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Kessler RC, Shahly V, Hudson JI, Supina D, Berglund PA, Chiu WT et al. A comparative analysis of role attainment and impairment in binge-eating disorder and bulimia nervosa: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2014 Mar;23(1):27-41. DOI: 10.1017/S2045796013000516
dc.identifier.issn 2045-7960
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/36521
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Cross-national population data from the WHO World Mental Health surveys are used to compare role attainments and role impairments associated with binge-eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN). METHODS: Community surveys assessed 23 000 adults across 12 countries for BED, BN and ten other DSM-IV mental disorders using the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Age-of-onset was assessed retrospectively. Ten physical disorders were assessed using standard conditions checklists. Analyses examined reciprocal time-lagged associations of eating disorders (EDs) with education, associations of early-onset (i.e., prior to completing education) EDs with subsequent adult role attainments and cross-sectional associations of current EDs with days of role impairment. RESULTS: BED and BN predicted significantly increased education (females). Student status predicted increased risk of subsequent BED and BN (females). Early-onset BED predicted reduced odds of current (at time of interview) marriage (females) and reduced odds of current employment (males). Early-onset BN predicted increased odds of current work disability (females and males). Current BED and BN were both associated with significantly increased days of role impairment (females and males). Significant BED and BN effects on adult role attainments and impairments were explained by controls for comorbid disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Effects of BED on role attainments and impairments are comparable with those of BN. The most plausible interpretation of the fact that these associations are explained by comorbid disorders is that causal effects of EDs are mediated through secondary disorders. Controlled treatment effectiveness studies are needed to trace out long-term effects of BED-BN on secondary disorders.
dc.description.sponsorship These activities were supported by the United States National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH070884) and the Mental Health Burden Study (Contract number HHSN271200700030C). The São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey is supported by the State of São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) Thematic Project Grant 03/00204-3. The ESEMeD project is funded by the European Commission (Contracts QLG5-1999-01042; SANCO 2004123 and EAHC 20081308), (the Piedmont Region (Italy)), Fondo de Investigación Sanitaria, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain (FIS 00/0028), Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, Spain (SAF 2000-158-CE), Departament de Salut, Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (CIBER CB06/02/0046, RETICS RD06/ 0011 REM-TAP), and other local agencies and by an unrestricted educational grant from GlaxoSmithKline. The Mexican National Comorbidity Survey (MNCS) is supported by The National Institute of Psychiatry Ramon de la Fuente (INPRFMDIES 4280) and by the National Council on Science and Technology (CONACyTG30544- H), with supplemental support from the PanAmerican Health Organization (PAHO). The US National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH; U01-MH60220) with supplemental support from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF; Grant 044708), and the John W. Alden Trust
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartof Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences. 2014 Mar;23(1):27-41
dc.rights © Cambridge University Press. Kessler RC, Shahly V, Hudson JI, Supina D, Berglund PA, Chiu WT et al. A comparative analysis of role attainment and impairment in binge-eating disorder and bulimia nervosa: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2014 Mar; 23(1): 27-41 is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S2045796013000516
dc.subject.other Trastorn per afartament
dc.subject.other Bulímia
dc.title A comparative analysis of role attainment and impairment in binge-eating disorder and bulimia nervosa: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S2045796013000516
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics

Compliant to Partaking