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Cranberries attenuate animal-based diet-induced changes in microbiota composition and functionality: a randomized crossover controlled feeding trial

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dc.contributor.author Rodríguez-Morató, Jose, 1987-
dc.contributor.author Matthan, Nirupa R.
dc.contributor.author Liu, Jin
dc.contributor.author Torre Fornell, Rafael de la
dc.contributor.author Oliver Chen, CY
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-09T10:45:57Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Rodríguez-Morató J, Matthan NR, Liu J, de la Torre R, Chen CO. Cranberries attenuate animal-based diet-induced changes in microbiota composition and functionality: a randomized crossover controlled feeding trial. J Nutr Biochem. 2018 Sep 8;62:76-86. DOI: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.08.019
dc.identifier.issn 0955-2863
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/35586
dc.description.abstract Cranberries have multiple health effects but their impact on gut microbiota has not been examined in randomized controlled feeding trials. We evaluated the relationship between the microbiota and cranberries in the context of an animal-based diet. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over, controlled design trial, 11 healthy adults consumed for 5 days each a control diet (animal-based diet plus 30 g/day placebo powder) and a cranberry diet (animal-based diet plus 30 g/day freeze-dried whole cranberry powder). The animal-based diet included meats, dairy products, and simple sugars. Stool, urine, and blood samples were obtained before and after each intervention phase. As compared to the pre-control diet, control diet modified 46 taxonomic clades, including an increase in the abundance of Firmicutes and decrease in Bacteroidetes. Moreover, it increased bacteria-derived deoxycholic acid and decreased acetate and butyrate in stool. As compared to the post-intervention phase of control diet, the cranberry diet modified 9 taxonomic clades, including a decrease in the abundance of Firmicutes and increase in Bacteroidetes. Further, the cranberry diet attenuated control diet-induced increase in secondary bile acids and decrease in short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), and increased urinary anthocyanins and bacterially derived phenolic acids. No changes were found in fecal trimethylamine and plasma cytokines. In conclusion, an animal-based diet altered the microbiota composition to a less favorable profile, increased carcinogenic bile acids, and decreased beneficial SCFA. Cranberries attenuated the impact of the animal-based diet on microbiota composition, bile acids, and SCFA, evidencing their capacity to modulate the gut microbiota.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by Cranberry Institute and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) [1950-51000-087]. JRM acknowledges funding from European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 712949 (TECNIOspring PLUS) and from ACCIÓ
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2018 Sep 8;62:76-86
dc.rights © Elsevier http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.08.019
dc.subject.other Nabiu de grua
dc.subject.other Microbiologia
dc.subject.other Polifenols
dc.subject.other Àcid biliar
dc.subject.other Àcids grassos
dc.subject.other Assaigs clínics
dc.title Cranberries attenuate animal-based diet-induced changes in microbiota composition and functionality: a randomized crossover controlled feeding trial
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.08.019
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/712949
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion


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