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Starting research in interaction design with visuals for low-functioning children in the autistic spectrum: a protocol

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dc.contributor.author Parés, Narcís, 1966-
dc.contributor.author Carreras, Anna
dc.contributor.author Durany, Jaume
dc.contributor.author Ferrer, Jaume
dc.contributor.author Freixa Font, Pere
dc.contributor.author Gómez, David
dc.contributor.author Kruglanski, O.
dc.contributor.author Parés, Roc, 1968-
dc.contributor.author Ribas, Joan Ignasi
dc.contributor.author Soler, M.
dc.contributor.author Sanjurjo, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-14T08:08:20Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-14T08:08:20Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Parés N, Carreras A, Durany J, Ferrer J, Freixa P, Gomez D et al. Starting research in interaction design with visuals for low-functioning children in the autistic spectrum: a protocol. Cyberpsychol Behav. 2006;9(2):218-223. DOI 10.1089/cpb.2006.9.218.
dc.identifier.issn 1094-9313
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/25984
dc.description.abstract On starting to think about interaction design for low-functioning persons in the autistic spectrum (PAS), especially children, one finds a number of questions that are difficult to answer: Can we typify the PAS user? Can we engage the user in interactive communication without generating frustrating or obsessive situations? What sort of visual stimuli can we provide? Will they prefer representational or abstract visual stimuli? Will they understand threedimensional (3D) graphic representation? What sort of interfaces will they accept? Can we set ambitious goals such as education or therapy? Unfortunately, most of these questions have no answer yet. Hence, we decided to set an apparently simple goal: to design a "fun application," with no intention to reach the level of education or therapy. The goal was to be attained by giving the users a sense of agency—by providing first a sense of control in the interaction dialogue. Our approach to visual stimuli design has been based on the use of geometric, abstract, two-dimensional (2D), real-time computer graphics in a full-body, non-invasive, interactive space. The results obtained within the European-funded project MultiSensory Environment Design for an Interface between Autistic and Typical Expressiveness (MEDIATE) have been extremely encouraging.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
dc.relation.ispartof CyberPsychology & Behavior. 2006;9(2):218-223.
dc.rights Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2006.9.218
dc.title Starting research in interaction design with visuals for low-functioning children in the autistic spectrum: a protocol
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2006.9.218
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion


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