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Are attitudes towards mental health help-seeking associated with service use? Results from the European Study of Epidemiology of Mental Disorders

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dc.contributor.author ten Have, Margreet
dc.contributor.author de Graaf, Ron
dc.contributor.author Ormel, Johan
dc.contributor.author Vilagut Saiz, Gemma, 1975-
dc.contributor.author Kovess, Viviane
dc.contributor.author Alonso Caballero, Jordi
dc.contributor.author ESEMeD/MHEDEA 2000 investigators
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-19T13:56:55Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-19T13:56:55Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation ten Have M, de Graaf R, Ormel J, Vilagut G, Kovess V, Alonso J et al. Are attitudes towards mental health help-seeking associated with service use? Results from the European Study of Epidemiology of Mental Disorders. Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology. 2010; 45(2): 153-163. DOI 10.1007/s00127-009-0050-4
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/25603
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevailing attitudes towards mental health help-seeking in Europe, their correlates, and whether these attitudes are associated with actual service use for mental health problems. METHOD: Data were derived from the European Study of Epidemiology of Mental Disorders, a survey representative of the adult population of six countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain (n = 8,796). The World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess attitudes and DSM-IV diagnoses. The attitudes referred to beliefs that the respondents would seek professional help when faced with a serious emotional problem, would feel comfortable talking about personal problems with a professional, would not be embarrassed if friends knew about the professional help, and respondents' perceived effectiveness of mental health care. RESULTS: Almost a third of the respondents held the view that professional care was worse than or equal to no help when faced with serious emotional problems. Female gender, being younger than 65 years of age, high income, living in Spain or Italy, presence of mood disorder and previous service use were associated with at least two of the four assessed attitudes towards mental health help-seeking. All four attitudes were significantly associated with mental health care use, also after adjustment for previous service use. CONCLUSION: The low perceived effectiveness of professional care calls for serious action aiming to improve the visibility and credibility of the mental health care sector.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by the Netherlands Mental Health Fund (Fonds Psychische Gezondheid). The ESEMeD project was funded by the European Commission (Contracts QLG5-1999-01042; SANCO 2004123), the Piedmont Region (Italy), Fondo de Investigación Sanitaria, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain (FIS 00/0028-02), Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, Spain (SAF 2000-158-CE), Departament de Salut, Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain, and other local agencies and by an unrestricted educational grant from GlaxoSmithKline.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer
dc.relation.ispartof Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology. 2010; 45(2): 153-163
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
dc.subject.other Malalties mentals -- Tractament
dc.title Are attitudes towards mental health help-seeking associated with service use? Results from the European Study of Epidemiology of Mental Disorders
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-009-0050-4
dc.subject.keyword Public opinion
dc.subject.keyword Mental health services
dc.subject.keyword Epidemiology
dc.subject.keyword Cultural differences
dc.subject.keyword Population study
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion


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