Factor prices and productivity growth during the British Industrial Revolution

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Explorations in Economic History, January 2003, 40 (1), pp. 52-77
http://hdl.handle.net/10230/495
To cite or link this document: http://hdl.handle.net/10230/495
dc.contributor.author Antràs, Pol
dc.contributor.author Voth, Hans Joachim
dc.contributor.other Universitat Pompeu Fabra. Departament d'Economia i Empresa
dc.date.issued 2000-10-01
dc.identifier.citation Explorations in Economic History, January 2003, 40 (1), pp. 52-77
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10230/495
dc.description.abstract This paper presents new estimates of total factor productivity growth in Britain for the period 1770–1860. We use the dual technique and argue that the estimates we derive from factor prices are of similar quality to quantity-based calculations. Our results provide further evidence, calculated on the basis of an independent set of sources, that productivity growth during the British Industrial Revolution was relatively slow. The Crafts–Harley view of the Industrial Revolution is thus reinforced. Our preferred estimates suggest a modest acceleration after 1800.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartofseries Economics and Business Working Papers Series; 495
dc.rights L'accés als continguts d'aquest document queda condicionat a l'acceptació de les condicions d'ús establertes per la següent llicència Creative Commons
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
dc.title Factor prices and productivity growth during the British Industrial Revolution
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/workingPaper
dc.date.modified 2014-06-03T07:14:02Z
dc.subject.keyword Economic and Business History
dc.subject.keyword british industrial revolution
dc.subject.keyword productivity growth
dc.subject.keyword dual measurement of productivity
dc.rights.accessRights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess


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